New Media and Communication

Korea University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    New Media and Communication

  • Host University

    Korea University

  • Location

    Seoul, South Korea

  • Area of Study

    Communication, Media Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Course Description:

    As breakthroughs in medical and computer science continuously expand the scope of our bodily and mental presence, the question concerning technology – the role it plays in defining our being and reality, its functional mechanism, and the effects such new methods of mediation exert upon our perception and cognition – presses us with an ever-growing urgency. How do we define and know who we are, and how does one certify his or her own existence, in an age when mechanical augmentation, extension, or even replacement of the body is a realistic venture, and the properties of the human mind can be reproduced, preserved, and/or emulated in the form of digital code? If the human body and its operational constitution could be compatible with that of machines, and self-evolving machines could interact with or even replace humans in their intellectual capacity, what does being human and discerning the grounds of the reality we inhabit involve, and mean? Do new mediatory means reconfigure the way in which we perceive, comprehend, and in turn build the world we live in? This course explores how new media represent, reflect on, and inspire reality and being by focusing on the structure and workings of digital and other types of telepresence technology. Students will examine how presence and its representation have transitioned from analog to digital, and organic to mechanic channels of mediation and instantiation. Course materials and exercises will include primary materials ranging from short stories to film, animation, TV, games, virtual reality content, etc., and theoretical/critical works on various media/form. In addition to reading the assigned texts, students will be expected to engage in class discussions, collective in-class writings, short individual writings, and group/solo presentations.

    Course Objectives:

    • Interrogate what “media” (and other related terms and concepts such as mediation

    and representation) means across temporal, cultural, material, and relational parameters

    • Think about the new-old dynamic in media. What would qualify as new media, and why? How does the old become new, and new grow old? How does this process influence our perception and cognition?
    • Examine and engage with various media instantiations (their workings, structures, effects, evolution, and interrelations)
    • Explore how the changing mediascape of the past, present, and future (the advent of the digital age ) shape our understanding of being, reality, and the society
    • Develop critical skills to situate and comprehend the texts within the social and historical rubrics from which they were conceived and are currently consumed
    • Acquire the tools (vocabulary, concept, historiography, etc.) to critically think and write about media.

    Assignments and Guidelines:

    • All students are welcome to, and even expected to bring their laptops, tablets, and other electronic devices to class. However, this liberty comes with responsibility. Do not digress from class discussions (such as browsing unrelated content, hanging out on social media platforms, checking email, etc.)
    • All readings and materials available on the Web or Google Drive

    (details to be shared in class)

    Readings:

    Read or view all assigned materials before coming to class. This is a seminar; the class cannot “happen” without your input.

    Group Presentations:

    Sign up for group pres slots on the first day of class. Present for 30 min., and then lead class discussion for at least 15 min. The most standard format would be Powerpoint, but the use of various media is encouraged.

    An excellent presentation is expected to possess the following qualities:

    • Introduce basic information about the text/author and historical context
    • Provide close readings of scenes, sequences, or segments of interest from the text
    • Reflection on the medium, effect and use
    • Develop and share critical questions the class could collective reflect on
    • Accurate use of sources, citations (MLA style), and references
    • A critical treatment of sources that is not limited to mere summary or description
    • An engaging and eloquent style of verbal and written performance
    • Make sure to understand and avoid plagiarism
    • Group presentations require collaboration. Ensure proper role division.

    Individual Presentations:

    Throughout Week 6, in an academic conference format. Pick a topic/material of interest, develop a thesis, and analyze. The group presentation experience would serve as a great practicing ground for the solo presentation. Keep the following in mind:

    • There must be a clear thesis/argument that guides subject matter for the presentation. In other words, articulate the significance of your critical intervention.
    • Provide close readings of scenes, sequences, or segments of interest from the text
    • Reflection on the medium, effect and use
    • Accurate use of sources, citations (MLA style), and references
    • A critical treatment of sources that is not limited to mere summary or description
    • An engaging and eloquent style of verbal and written performance
    • Make sure to understand and avoid plagiarism
    • Submit any and all material used for final presentation after class performance in email attachment

    Reflection Essay:

    Students will also compose and submit a (min.) one-page reflection essay that summarizes the presentation in written form. Times New Roman font (size 12), one-inch margins on all sides, must have a concrete title, and proper formatting (course title, name, etc.) on the top left. The reflection essays are due on the last day of week 5 (Friday, midnight). Submit word document as email attachment. Format should be [your first name_final].

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.