Sustainability Strategies

Korea University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Sustainability Strategies

  • Host University

    Korea University

  • Location

    Seoul, South Korea

  • Area of Study

    Environmental Studies, Environmental Sustainability, Sustainable Development

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

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    Hours & Credits

  • Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Course:      

    Mankind has been warned for decades that global biodiversity is declining at an alarming rate, putting the survival of other species and its very own future at risk. The 2016 edition of The World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) Report Living Planet describes the enormity of the situation - and proposes how we can start to put it right. The Living Planet Index reveals that global populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles have declined by 58 per cent between 1970 and 2012 and that we could witness a two-thirds decline in the half-century from 1970 to 2020 – unless Mankind acts now (and develops and implements credible Sustainable Strategies) to properly reform its food and energy systems and meet global commitments on addressing climate change, together protecting biodiversity and supporting Sustainable Development.

    Earth’s ecosystems have evolved over millions of years. This process has resulted in diverse and complex biological communities living in balance with their environment (including mankind’s interconnection with Nature). In addition to their inherent values, diverse ecosystems also provide the foundation for human livelihoods and well-being. However, the size and scale of the human enterprise have grown exponentially since the mid-20th century and thus, Nature and the exclusive services it provides to humanity are subject to increasing risk. To draw attention to our potentially perilous environmental situation, Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen and others have suggested that we have transitioned from the Holocene (the current geological epoch which started some 11,500 years ago, when the glaciers began to retreat) into a new geological epoch, calling it the ‘Anthropocene’. During the Anthropocene, the climate is changing rapidly, oceans are acidifying and entire biomes (a distinct ecological community of plants and animals living together in a particular climate) are disappearing – all at a rate measurable within a single human lifetime! The future of many living organisms is now in question (for example: Cheetahs today number only 7,000 in the wild and recent, continued declines have led to the Cheetah being classified as an endangered species). And not only are wild plants, animals and all species that make up biodiversity at risk: people are increasingly becoming victims of the deteriorating state of nature. Climate and other predictive models suggest that without action during this ‘so called’ Anthropocene period, the Earth will become much less hospitable to our modern globalised society.

    Mankind has been warned for decades that global biodiversity is declining at an alarming rate, putting the survival of other species and its very own future at risk. The 2016 edition of The World Wildlife Fund’s (WWF) Report Living Planet describes the enormity of the situation - and proposes how we can start to put it right. The Living Planet Index reveals that global populations of fish, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles have declined by 58 per cent between 1970 and 2012 and that we could witness a two-thirds decline in the half-century from 1970 to 2020 – unless Mankind acts now (and develops and implements credible Sustainable Strategies) to properly reform its food and energy systems and meet global commitments on addressing climate change, together protecting biodiversity and supporting Sustainable Development.

    Earth’s ecosystems have evolved over millions of years. This process has resulted in diverse and complex biological communities living in balance with their environment (including mankind’s interconnection with Nature). In addition to their inherent values, diverse ecosystems also provide the foundation for human livelihoods and well-being. However, the size and scale of the human enterprise have grown exponentially since the mid-20th century and thus, Nature and the exclusive services it provides to humanity are subject to increasing risk. To draw attention to our potentially perilous environmental situation, Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen and others have suggested that we have transitioned from the Holocene (the current geological epoch which started some 11,500 years ago, when the glaciers began to retreat) into a new geological epoch, calling it the ‘Anthropocene’. During the Anthropocene, the climate is changing rapidly, oceans are acidifying and entire biomes (a distinct ecological community of plants and animals living together in a particular climate) are disappearing – all at a rate measurable within a single human lifetime! The future of many living organisms is now in question (for example: Cheetahs today number only 7,000 in the wild and recent, continued declines have led to the Cheetah being classified as an endangered species). And not only are wild plants, animals and all species that make up biodiversity at risk: people are increasingly becoming victims of the deteriorating state of nature. Climate and other predictive models suggest that without action during this ‘so called’ Anthropocene period, the Earth will become much less hospitable to our modern globalised society.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.