Irish Studies 2

Maynooth University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Irish Studies 2

  • Host University

    Maynooth University

  • Location

    Dublin, Ireland

  • Area of Study

    Irish Culture

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    5
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    2
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    3
  • Overview

    Building on Irish Studies I, this module will first examine various aspects of Irish writing and culture since the partition of the island into two separate states in 1921. The second half of the module will explore cinema?s place in Irish life during its long twentieth century. Many have felt that once the revolutionary political excitements of the war of independence and the cultural ferment of the Irish Literary Revival had abated, Irish society across the island settled into an extended period of conservative stupor characterized by repressive and insular majoritarianisms. This view of things probably underplays the degree of social conflict still at work within both states throughout the century and by the 1960s at any rate the combined effects of industrial modernization and the women?s movement in the South and the civil rights campaigns and the ?Troubles? in the North generated levels of social agitation and conservative backlash sufficient to convulse the island for several decades. This module will explore the complex relationship between cultural and social change in Ireland between the 1920s and the present. Having read a variety of literary texts and viewed a range of films, students will be asked to consider these in the light of ongoing debates in Irish Studies about the nature of modern Irish society and culture.

    Learning Outcomes:

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:
    - Demonstrate and ability to critically examine a range of key twentieth century Irish literary, cultural and cinematic texts
    - Demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of Irish cultural history to the interpretation of twentieth-century Irish literary and cinematic works.
    - Show a detailed knowledge of the complex relationship that existed between cultural and social change in Ireland between the 1920s and the present.
    - Demonstrate high quality verbal and written expression; the ability to make clear points in a lucid grammatical and confident manner.
    - Write an essay on a chosen topic or topics, demonstrating the ability to integrate source material and critical readings; synthesise arguments; justify critical approaches and opinions.
    - Write responses to exam questions, demonstrating the ability to integrate source material and critical readings; synthesise arguments; justify critical approaches and opinions.

    Teaching & Learning Methods:
    - Lectures: 20 hours
    - Independent student activities: 60 hours

    Assessment:
    - Continuous Assessment: 50%
    - University scheduled written examination: 50%

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.