Philosophy of God: Reason, Science and Religion

Maynooth University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Philosophy of God: Reason, Science and Religion

  • Host University

    Maynooth University

  • Location

    Dublin, Ireland

  • Area of Study

    Philosophy, Religion

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    5
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    2
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    3
  • Overview

    This module takes as its starting point the lively contemporary debate concerning the existence and nature of God and sets out to investigate from a philosophical point of view the relationship between reason, science and religion. The most common arguments for the existence of God will be identified and outlined with a view to assessing their validity. Particular attention will be paid to the philosophical issues which arise within the contemporary 'God debate' in connection with the theory of Evolution and theories concerning the make-up and origins of the universe. The philosophical problem of evil will be examined as it presents a major challenge to belief in an all-knowing, all-powerful and all-good God.

    Learning Outcomes:

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:
    -Identify the main lines of argument in contemporary debate concerning the existence and nature of God.
    -Discuss in a philosophically sophisticated way the relationship between reason, science and religion.
    -Identify and discriminate between the various 'traditional' proofs for the existence of God within the Western philosophical tradition, with the aim of assessing both their validity as philosophical arguments and their relevance for debate concerning the existence of God in our own time.
    -Explain how the theory of Evolution and contemporary theories concerning the make-up and origins of the universe can represent a challenge to 'traditional' philosophical proofs for the existence of God.
    -Identify and examine the 'attributes' applied to God in the Western philosophical tradition (i.e., goodness, omnipotence, omniscience) with a view to assessing the coherence of theism.
    -Analyse the philosophical problem of evil as a major challenge for belief in the existence of an all-powerful, all-knowing and all-good God.
    -Present and articulate, in scholarly written format, a cogent argument for a position taken in relation to a philosophical approach to considering the question of the existence of God today.
    -Demonstrate ability to select and think-through a response that is of relevance to the set essay-assignment tasks in addressing issues of concern in philosophy of God, reason, science and religion.

    Teaching & Learning methods:
    24 lecture hours (12 weeks x 2 lecture hours per week); 3 tutorial hours (x 15 tutorial groups); reading, reflection, discussion and writing.

    Assessment:
    Continuous Assessment detail(s): 5% = Attendance at Tutorials. 20% = Tutorial Essay-Assignment (c. 1,000 words) 15% = Presentation 60% = Final Essay-Assignment (c. 2,000 words).

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.