Crime and the Media

Dublin City University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Crime and the Media

  • Host University

    Dublin City University

  • Location

    Dublin, Ireland

  • Area of Study

    Criminology, Media and Journalism, Media Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    5
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    2
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    3
  • Overview

    Description
    This module introduces students to the sociological analysis of crime and its representation in the media. It examines and evaluates key sociological perspectives that offer different explanations for the existence of crime. It also examines the process by which laws are created and who benefits or suffers from the law making process. It examines the portrayal of crime by the media and asks whether such representations are a true or distorted reflection of social reality and it also examines what effects, if any, these representations have on public opinion. It also examines key institutions involved in the judicial system focusing particularly on the Prison Service.

    Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify and articulate the causes and consequences of crime in society.
    2. Identify and articulate the links between social class, types of crimes and the law making process.
    3. Review, appraise and interpret crime statistics and literature relating to specific crimes.
    4. Review, appraise and interpret the ways in which crime is differentially dealt with by society.
    5. Evaluate the manner in which the media report and comment on crime and justice issues and the possible effects of such reportage on public opinion.
    6. Identify and articulate the use of crime as a means of political communication.