Media and Power

Dublin City University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Media and Power

  • Host University

    Dublin City University

  • Location

    Dublin, Ireland

  • Area of Study

    Media and Journalism, Media Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    5
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    7
  • Overview

    Description
    This module will provide : .1) An introduction to major concepts and theories concerning the relations between the media of public communication and the crucial forms of power in contemporary societies (e.g. manifest and latent power; coercion versus consent; political, symbolic and economic forms of power; power as dispersed or concentrated). Here, and throughout the module, there is a strong emphasis on news, current affairs and related ‘informational’ media genres. .2) Selective review of competing theories/perspectives on : .a) The major institutions or sources of social, political economic, cultural or ideological power; .b) How major forms or layers of institutionalised power may influence the operations and content of public communication media (e.g. role of political-economic, organisational, professional/journalistic, ideological and symbolic forms of power); .c) Role and influence of different ‘media systems’; ownership and management forms; funding and financial influences (advertising, sponsorship, subsidies); state policies and regulation; industry self-regulation. 

    Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify, describe and compare some of the major concepts and theories concerning the relations between mediated communication and the crucial forms of power in contemporary societies.
    2. Critically engage with competing theoretical perspectives on the question of how the major institutions or sources of social, political economic, cultural or ideological power influence the operations and content of public communication media.
    3. Describe how selected key schools or theorists view ‘media power’ as an increasingly important force relative to other forms of social power in the early 21st century, including the role of successive communication networks and systems and related media practices (e.g professional and citizen journalism and news making).
    4. Engage with research-based concepts and analyses of those issues in ways which transcend the taken-for-granted assumptions of everyday media discourse.
    5. Advance their own understandings of how the media relate to the key sources, clusters or layers of organised and structural power in modern societies