Modernist Women''s Fiction

Trinity College Dublin

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Modernist Women''s Fiction

  • Host University

    Trinity College Dublin

  • Location

    Dublin, Ireland

  • Area of Study

    English, Literature, Women's Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    5
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    7
  • Overview

    In February 1917, the New York Evening Sun, February 1917 proclaimed: ?Some people think that women
    are the cause of Modernism, whatever that is.? In The Gender of Modernism (1990) Clare Hanson argues: ?One might suggest that the initial impetus for modernism came in fact from women writers, so that to talk of a female version of modernism?implying as econdary position for women?is misleading? (p. 303). In this one semester course we will examine these claims by looking at the way in which female modernists challenged received notions of gender and sexuality in their fiction, interrogated the romance plot, and explored questions of national identity, war, and social progress. We will also be looking at their stylistic innovations both in the novel form and in the short story.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.