Mathematics 2E: Introduction To Real Analysis

University of Glasgow

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Mathematics 2E: Introduction To Real Analysis

  • Host University

    University of Glasgow

  • Location

    Glasgow, Scotland

  • Area of Study

    Mathematics

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    Mathematics 1R or 1X at grade D and 1S or 1T or 1Y at grade D and a pass in the level 1 Skills test.

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Scotcat Credits

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    2.5 - 3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    1
  • Overview

    Course Aims
    The common thread running through this is the notion of limit. This course will give a precise definition of this notion for both sequences and series. The notion of continuity for functions will be discussed and related to convergence of sequences. Some important consequences of continuity to be studied are the intermediate value theorem and its applications, and the existence of extrema. The emphasis is on developing and applying standard techniques of proof to give rigorous arguments from basic definitions.

    Assessment
    One degree examination (80%) (1 hour 30 mins); coursework (20%).

    Main Assessment In: April/May

    Course Aims
    The common thread running through this is the notion of limit. This course will give a precise definition of this notion for both sequences and series. The notion of continuity for functions will be discussed and related to convergence of sequences. Some important consequences of continuity to be studied are the intermediate value theorem and its applications, and the existence of extrema. The emphasis is on developing and applying standard techniques of proof to give rigorous arguments from basic definitions.
    Intended Learning Outcomes of Course
    Students should understand and be able to recall the definitions and proofs and be able to apply the results to the types of problem covered in lectures and tutorials.
    In particular, students should be able to: deal with implications and equivalences; interpret the negation of a statement involving quantifiers; recognise various methods of proof (direct, contrapositive, counterexample, contradiction, induction); show that a function is bounded/unbounded; show, directly from the definition, that a given number is the limit of a given sequence; evaluate sequence limits using arithmetic and order properties; show that a given sequence is monotonic; investigate sequences defined recursively; use subsequences to establish non-convergence; test series for convergence/divergence; test series for absolute/conditional convergence; determine, directly from the definition, whether a function is continuous; use the sequential characterisation to establish discontinuity;solve problems using the intermediate value and extreme value theorems.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.