Camera Directing

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Camera Directing

  • Host University

    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

  • Location

    Madrid, Spain

  • Area of Study

    Communication, Film Studies, Media Studies, Radio/Television/Film

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO HAVE COMPLETED
    Practical course with an extensive use of production and postproduction facilities and software, sound equipment and video cameras. Basic knowledge of technical aspects of filmmaking is recommended.

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    3
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    1
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    2
  • Overview

    COMPETENCES AND SKILLS THAT WILL BE ACQUIRED AND LEARNING RESULTS.
    1. Knowledge of basic skills of a film director at work filming / recording.
    2. Understanding the members of a team approach to address the functions and assume different professional
    relationships established in the context of a film shoot. Capacity and ability to clearly communicate management
    decisions taken in the development of filmmaking.
    3. Capacity and ability to distinguish and identify the available techniques by a director for a film shoot.
    4. Ability to develop strategies in the direction of creative work during the filming / recording.
    DESCRIPTION OF CONTENTS: PROGRAMME
    Course Description:
    An intensive theoretical and practical study of the craft of directing for camera in film and television, filmmaking, and audiovisual creation with emphasis on developing creative camera proficiency. The course will provideanalysis of contemporary visual narrative and non-narrative constructions that will be applied in the production of in-class practical exercises to develop technical and aesthetic notions for audiovisual production and postproduction. Each student will complete a final short video project applying the concepts developed during the course.
    LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND METHODOLOGY
    Professor: Bruno Lazaro
    ASSESSMENT SYSTEM
    Evaluation:
    · Attendance, participation and technical competence 15%
    · In-class assignments 40%
    · Final video project 45%
    % end-of-term-examination: 20
    % of continuous assessment (assigments, laboratory, practicals?): 80
    BASIC BIBLIOGRAPHY
    - Christopher Kenworthy Master Shots: 100 Advanced Camera Techniques to Get an Expensive Look on, Michael
    Wiese Productions, 2009
    - Jeremy Vineyard, Jose Cruz Setting Up Your Shots: Great Camera Moves Every Filmmaker Should Know,
    Michael Wiese Productions, 2008
    - Richard D. Pepperman Setting Up Your Scenes: The Inner Workings of Great Films, Michael Wiese
    Productions, 2005
    - Jacqueline B. Frost Cinematography for Directors: A Guide for Creative Collaboration, Michael Wiese
    Productions, 2009
    - RABIGER, MICHAEL Directing: Film Techniques and Aesthetics, Screencraft Series Focal Press, 2008
    - Karl Reisz, Gavin Millar The Technique of Film Editing, Elsevier/Focal Press, 2009
    ADITIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
    - Jeremy Vineyard, Jose Cruz Setting Up Your Shots: Great Camera Moves Every Filmmaker Should Know,
    Michael Wiese Productions, 2008
    - BROWN, Blain. Motion Picture and Video Lighting., Newton, MA: Focal Press..
    - KINGDOM, Tom Total Directing: Integrating Camera and Performance in Film and Television., Silman James
    Press..
    - Christopher Kenworthy Master Shots: 100 Advanced Camera Techniques to Get an Expensive Look on, Michael
    Wiese Productions, 2009

Course Disclaimer

Please note that there are no beginning level Spanish courses offered in this program.

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Please reference fall and spring course lists as not all courses are taught during both semesters.

Availability of courses is based on enrollment numbers. All students should seek pre-approval for alternate courses in the event of last minute class cancellations

Please note that some courses with locals have recommended prerequisite courses. It is the student's responsibility to consult any recommended prerequisites prior to enrolling in their course.