Wind Energy

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Wind Energy

  • Host University

    Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

  • Location

    Madrid, Spain

  • Area of Study

    Engineering Science, Environmental Engineering, Systems Engineering

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO HAVE COMPLETED:

    All first and second year subjects. Among them, Electrical Power Engineering Fundamentals is of utmost importance. Furthermore, it is desirable to have followed "Electric Power Generation" in the first term of the third year.

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • ECTS Credits

    6
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Wind Energy (280 - 15070)
    Study: Bachelor in Energy Engineering
    Semester 2/Spring Semester
    3rd Year Course/Upper Division

    STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO HAVE COMPLETED:

    All first and second year subjects. Among them, Electrical Power Engineering Fundamentals is of utmost importance. Furthermore, it is desirable to have followed "Electric Power Generation" in the first term of the third year.

    Competences and Skills that will be Acquired and Learning Results:

    Students who successfully complete this course will be able:

    - to summarize the history of modern wind turbines justifying the current technology development. Moreover, students should employ the exact components terminology for the most common applications including, large onshore and offshore schemes as well as small wind turbines.

    - to compute the basic wind measurement statistics and understand the resource assessment process.

    - to understand and use the fundamental physics equations that allow to convert wind energy into mechanical and electrical energy.

    - to describe all wind turbines types and justify their main characteristics. Moreover, students should understand the main mathematical models for the most relevant types, with special emphasis on the different control strategies.

    - to identify the main wind turbine manufacturers, as well as to properly analyse and compare their technical specifications.

    - to understand the main impact from high penetration levels of wind energy, and the main aspects of the grid codes developed to mitigate them.

    - to understand results from dedicated software packages that model wind turbines for economic assessment or power systems analysis.

    - develop the capacity to work in a team and promote creative team interaction to encourage contribution from all
    members so as to deliver specific engineering projects and assignments

    Description of Contents: Course Description

    1- Introduction
    - History of the wind energy development
    - Wind energy statitistics
    - Current manufacturers and WT models
    - Wind power myths

    2- Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines
    - Wind Speed
    - Impact of Friction and Height on Wind Speed
    - Air Density
    - WT Blades
    - Angle of Attack
    - Relative Wind Speed
    - Pitch Angle
    - Coefficient of Performance
    - Tip-Speed Ratio
    - Blade Power
    - Separation of WTs

    3- Wind Statistics
    - Average Variance and Standard Deviation
    - Cumulative Distribution Function
    - Probability Density Function
    - Weibull Distribution Function
    - Rayleigh Distribution Function
    - Dependency and Repeatability
    - Cross-Correlation

    4- Overview of Wind Turbines
    - Classification of Wind Turbines
    - Alignment of Rotating Axis
    - Types of Generators
    - Speed of Rotation
    - Power Conversion
    - Control Actions
    - Types of Wind Turbines
    - Type 1 Wind Turbine
    - Type 2 Wind Turbine
    - Type 3 Wind Turbine
    - Type 4 Wind Turbine

    5- Wind turbine components
    - Aerodynamic
    - Mechanical
    - Generators
    - Power electronics

    6- Type 1 Wind Turbine System
    - Equivalent Circuit for the Squirrel-Cage Induction Generator
    - Power Flow
    - Electric Torque
    - Maximum Power
    - Maximum Torque
    - Assessment of Type 1 System
    - Control and Protection of Type 1 System
    - Reactive Power of Type 1 System
    - Inrush Current
    - Turbine Stability

    7- Type 2 Wind Turbine System
    - Equivalent Circuit of Type 2 Generator
    - Real Power
    - Electric Torque
    - Assessment of Type 2 System
    - Control and Protection of Type 2 System
    - Inrush Current
    - Turbine Stability

    8- Type 3 Wind Turbine System
    - Equivalent Circuit
    - Simplified Model
    - Power Flow
    - Apparent Power Flow through rotor side converter
    - Apparent Power Flow through stator side converter
    - Speed Control
    - Protection of Type 3 Systems
    - Electrical Protection
    - Electromechanical Protection

    9- Type 4 Wind Turbine
    - Full Converter
    - Power Flow
    - Real Power Control
    - Reactive Power Control
    - Protection
    - Chopper System
    - Dynamic Resistance

    10- Grid Integration
    - System stability
    - Low-Voltage Ride-Through Compliance Techniques
    - Variability of the Wind Power Production
    - Uncertainty of Wind Speed
    - Variability of Wind Power Output
    - Wind turbine reactive power control

    11- Economics of Wind Energy

    Learning Activities and Methodology:

    ORDINARY CALL (C1): CONTINUOUS EVALUATION (E1) and FINAL EXAM (E2):

    - (E1) Continuous evaluation (45% of the total)

    The small group project will account for the whole 45% of the continous evaluation. Being considered the report and eventually an oral examination if considered necessary after assessing the report.

    - (E2) Final exam (55% of the total grade)
    It will consist in solving numerical problems and theory related questions covering the whole content of the course.

    ----------------------------
    C1=0.45*E1+0.55*E2
    ----------------------------

    Note: to be eligeble to pass by the ordinary call (C1) it is mandatory to attend to all the laboratory sessions and have followed at least 10 problem sessions, solving all the problems by the end of the lecture. Furthermore, E2 has to be greater or equal to 3.0/10.
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    EXTRAORDINARY CALL (C2)

    - 100 % of the total record will come from a final exam (E3) that will consist in solving numerical problems and theory related questions covering the whole content of the course.

    ------------
    C2=E3
    ------------

    Note: to be eligeble to pass by the extraordinary call (C2) it is mandatory to attend to all the laboratory sessions.

    Basic Bibliography:

    Alois Schaffarczyk (Editor). Understanding Wind Power Technology: Theory, Deployment and Optimisation. Wiley. 2014
    By Mohamed A. El-Sharkawi. Wind Energy: An Introduction. CRC Press. 2015
    Gonzalo Abad, Jesus Lopez, Miguel Rodriguez, Luis Marroyo, Grzegorz Iwanski. Doubly Fed Induction Machine: Modeling and Control for Wind Energy Generation. Wiley-IEEE Press. 2011
    James F. Manwell, Jon G. McGowan, Anthony L. Rogers. Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application, 2nd Edition. Wiley. 2009
    Olimpo Anaya-Lara, Nick Jenkins, Janaka Ekanayake, Phill Cartwright, Michael Hughes. Wind Energy Generation: Modelling and Control. Wiley. 2009
    Thomas Ackermann (Editor). Wind Power in Power Systems, 2nd Edition. Wiley. 2012

    Additional Bibliography:

    Bin Wu, Yongqiang Lang, Navid Zargari, Samir Kouro. Power Conversion and Control of Wind Energy Systems. Wiley. 2011
    Paul A. Lynn. Onshore and Offshore Wind Energy An Introduction. Wiley. 2012
    R. Nolan Clark. Small Wind - Planning and Building Successful Installations. Elsevier. 2013
    Siegfried Heier. Grid Integration of Wind Energy: Onshore and Offshore Conversion Systems, 3rd Edition. Wiley. 2014
    Tony Burton, Nick Jenkins, David Sharpe, Ervin Bossanyi. Wind Energy Handbook, 2nd Edition. Wiley. 2011

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.