International Relations: Spain as a Gateway to Europe, Africa, and Latin America

Universidad de Málaga

Course Description

  • Course Name

    International Relations: Spain as a Gateway to Europe, Africa, and Latin America

  • Host University

    Universidad de Málaga

  • Location

    Málaga, Spain

  • Area of Study

    International Affairs, International Relations, International Studies

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

    Hours & Credits

  • Contact Hours

    45
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Course Description:

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the changing international world scenario. After analysing the inherent difficulties of maintaining good relations at local and international level, the students will examine the historical record of the developed countries in the 20th century, the Cold War, and the changing balance following the disintegration of the USSR. Special attention will be paid to the role of the US in the world, the methods and motives of international intervention, the duties of the major powers towards the developing countries and the response to the threat of international terrorism. Current conflictive areas will be analysed an the effectiveness of the international organizations will be assessed.

    Contents:

    UNIT 1 ? ?IT?S DIFFICULT TO GET ALONG?
    Man in society. The world at a glance. Opposing cultures.
    Discussion ?What?s the problem??

    UNIT 2 - TYPES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
    Political pressures and interventions. Economic interests. Social and humanitarian considerations.
    Discussion: ?Are these always contradictory??

    UNIT 3 - THE ALLIANCE SYNDROME: SELF PROTECTION
    International history 1900-1920. International history 1920-1945. Post-war USA.
    Discussion: ?What went wrong??

    UNIT 4 - THE COLD WAR
    Global security. The arms race & the space race. The disintegration of the USSR.
    Discussion: ?Do we trust each other??

    UNIT 5 - NEW WORLD STRUCTURES
    Global security: NATO. Regional integration and trading groups. The enlarged European Union.
    Discussion: ?How do these contribute to world peace??

    UNIT 6 - THE ROLE OF THE DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
    The rights and duties of the US. Barriers to be overcome: culture, race, religion, etc.
    Revision for mid-term exam and mid-term exam.

    UNIT 7 - SPECIFIC US INTERVENTIONS
    Where has the US intervened? Why was it considered necessary for US to intervene?
    What form did the intervention take?
    Discussion: ?How can we evaluate US actions??

    UNIT 8 - SHIFTING RELATIONS: CHINA
    Over the past two decades, China´s economy has experienced remarkable growth. How does this situation affect the relations with its neighbours, and with the rest of the world?
    Discussion: ?Is China becoming the new world power??

    UNIT 9 - MULTINATIONALS
    Objectives of multinational expansion. Responsibilities to host country. Economic, social and ethical considerations.
    Discussion: ?How do major US multinationals perform??

    UNIT 10 - THE GEOPOLITICS OF OIL
    From the steam power to the oil power.
    Political and economic impact of OPEC´s resolutons
    Dependence from the oil produced by politically unstable countries
    New demand from the uprising powers and the development of oil and gas pipelines
    Discussion: ?What will be the role of oil in the next decades??

    UNIT 11 - CURRENT ?HOT POTATOES?
    The Arab-Israeli crisis.
    The Afghan and Iraqui wars.
    Discussion: ?What?s the answer??

    UNIT 12 - INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM: A THREAT TO GLOBAL PEACE
    Concept and origins of terrorism. Nationalism and terrorism. Religion and terrorism.
    Discussion: ?Is there a process of radicalization in society??

    UNIT 13 - INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
    The UN: its role and its effectiveness. NATO: a military deterrent? Non-governmental organizations.
    Discussion: ?Are we doing enough??

    UNIT 14 - THE FUTURE OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
    Globalisation and environmental issues. What motivates governments?
    Preparation for final exam and final exam.

    Bibliography:

    Brown, C. & Ainley, K. Understanding International Relations. Palgrave Mc Millan, 2009.
    Huntington, Samuel P. The Clash of Civilization and the Remaking of the World Order. Simon and Schuster Paperbacks, 1996.
    Kissinger, H. Diplomacy. Simon and Schuster, 1994.

    Course Evaluation:

    Participation and attitude in class: 10%
    Quizzies and Homework Assignments: 20%
    Midterm Exam: 25%
    Final Exam: 35%
    Final Paper: 10%

    Final letter grades will be assigned using the following scale, expressed in terms of the percentage of total possible points earned:

    9 ? 10 = Sobresaliente
    7 ? 8.9 = Notable
    5 ? 6.9 = Aprobado
    0 ? 4.9 = Suspenso
    Attending the course but not taking the exams = No presentado
    Missing class more than permitted = No asistencia

    Attendance Policy:

    Attendance is obligatory. More than four hours of unexcused absence from class will endanger an officially certified completion of the course (grading + certificate). Medical absences are excused with the prompt receipt of proper documentation. It is expected that students arrive to class on time and that they return promptly to class after any given class break. Tardiness is figured into the absence policy.

    Class Protocol:

    Students are required to be involved in class activities. They are expected to show their preparation by participating in discussions, by asking relevant questions, being critical and analytical with the contents presented in class as well as by sharing their ideas and opinions. In class the student is required to maintain a polite demeanor always and under every circumstance. Students are asked not to eat in class and to put their cell phones on silence. With the exception being for class presentations, laptops are not to be used in class.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System) credits are converted to semester credits/quarter units differently among U.S. universities. Students should confirm the conversion scale used at their home university when determining credit transfer.

Availability of courses is based on enrollment numbers. All students should seek pre-approval for alternate courses in the event of last minute class cancellations