Global Economy and Developing Countries

ISA Study Center with Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo-Sevilla

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Global Economy and Developing Countries

  • Host University

    ISA Study Center with Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo-Sevilla

  • Location

    Seville, Spain

  • Area of Study

    Economics, International Economics

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4
  • Overview

    Course Objective: The course analyses the global economic and political scene and its major players: the new rising powers, i.e. Brazil, Russia, India and China and their relationship with the established power centers: Europe, USA and Japan.

    The course is designed to develop the critical conceptual framework to draw a wide panoramic canvas of the international order in the 21st century, taking a look at the economic, political and strategic/military dimensions -with a strong emphasis on the functioning of the global economic institutions (the financial and trade systems) and the role of all main players. Particular attention will be paid to the origin and evolution of globalization and its effect on the BRICs and other peripheral regions of the world economy. Finally, we shall take a look at the main theories and models on the workings of the global system paying special attention to the perspectives that the current global situation presents.

    Learning outcomes:

    - Students will learn the key features of the so-called new powers within the international economic and political context.

    - Students will gain an intellectual framework for understanding the current international order and the relation among key players.

    - Students will analyse both empirical and theoretical material and will be able to exercise critical judgement.

    Course contents:

    PART ONE:

    UNIT 1.- THE WORLD AND ITS INSTITUTIONS FROM 1945 TO 1989

    - Europe divided: the Yalta Conference and the origins of the Cold War - The United Nations: the rules of the game - The Bretton Woods framework: IMF, World Bank and GATT - The nuclear era: from M.A.D (Mutually Assured Destruction) to Star Wars (Strategic Defense Initiative)

    - The Cold War: from Korea and Vietnam to the Soviet defeat in Afghanistan - The fall of the Berlin wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union

    UNIT 2.- A NEW INTERNATIONAL ORDER? FROM THE END OF THE COLD WAR TO 9/11

    - The third wave of democratic change: from Latin America to South Africa, from Prague to Moscow and from the Philippines to South Korea

    - War and hope in the Middle East: the I Gulf War and the Oslo peace process

    - Change within the giants: from Yeltsin's to Putin's Russia; Rajiv Gandhi's reforms in India; Deng Xiao Ping's counter-Cultural Revolution in China; Europe's march forward from Maastricht to the euro

    - On the eve of 9/11: African tragedy and Arab/Moslem malaise

    UNIT 3.- EUROPE: HOLDING THE HOUSE TOGETHER

    - History's greatest success: shared sovereignty amongst enemies - Great social model, poor economic performance - The constitutional dilemma: integration vs enlargement - In search of a common voice in the world

    PART TWO:

    UNIT 4.- A BRAVE NEW WORLD: GLOBALIZATION AND THE NEW FORCES OF CHANGE

    - The world´s need of better economic BRICs. China, India and ex-communist Europe enter the world market; Latin America opens up

    - Will Mexico and South Korea become the new BRICs?

    - One world?: the technological revolution, Internet and the new media - The Washington consensus: free trade, deregulation and privatization - Financial crises, income inequalities and non-performing economies - The wave of the future: immigration - Cultural backlash: fundamentalism, nationalism and populism

    UNIT 5.- THE RISE OF CHINA: BETWEEN GROWTH AND INSTABILITY

    - "To get rich is glorious": Deng Xiao Ping unleashes market forces - Breakneck growth, internal inequalities and international clout - Mean new kid on the block: an expanding military unsettles the neighbors - Subtle diplomacy for a "peaceful rise"

    UNIT 6.- INDIA'S AWAKENING: THE POWER OF DIVERSITY

    - From Nehru to his grandson Rajiv Gandhi: independence, statism and backwardness - Rajiv Gandhi's reforms awaken the slumbering elephant - The intractable complexity of the world's largest democracy - From back office to brainpower of the global economy

    UNIT 7.- RUSSIA IS BACK: BEWARE THE NUCLEAR BEAR

    - A strong man needed: shrinking population, Chechenian wars and authoritarian rule

    - Trouble in the "near-abroad": Georgia, Ukraine, the Baltic states and the South Asian Republics - The bear besieged: NATO encroachment and UE enlargement - Energy as foreign policy tool - A new cold war? The nuclear equation still holds

    UNIT 8.- BRAZIL, THE NEW LATIN POWER

    - From Vasco de Gama to Lula

    - From agribusiness to the technological sector

    - Mercosur: the South American economic integration process

    - Lula´s recipe for success

    UNIT 9.- THE UNITED STATES: THE INSECURE HEGEMONY

    - Nº 1 economy: from high tech engine to unbalanced behemoth - The failings of democracy: loud money, silent voters - After 9/11: the superpower shoots itself in the foot - Adroit diplomacy to lead the world: freeze Russia, contain China, befriend India, pull up Latin America, support united Europe and rescue Africa - Mapping out tomorrow's world for a diminished West

    UNIT 10.- OLD INSTITUTIONS IN A NEW ERA

    - The war&peace game: global terrorism or big power conflict? - Global justice: crimes (against humanity) and punishment - Trade and finance: the Doha Round and the new financial architecture - Development: the millennium goals - Global plagues: climate change, pandemics and mafias - Can we work it out? Population growth and the Earth's equilibrium

    Bibliography: Along with selections from primary texts, students will be provided selections from other sources including:

    - Postwar: A History of Europe since 1945 (Tony Judt, 2005); Fourth Part: After the Fall (1980-2005) - The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers (Paul Kennedy, 1989). Third Part: Strategy and Economics Today and Tomorrow - Diplomacy (Henry Kissinger, 1994); Final Chapters: The End of the Cold War, The New World Order Reconsidered - Interview on the XXI Century (Eric Hobsbawn, 1999) - The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (Samuel P. Huntington, 1997) - Democracy and the Global Order: From the Modern State to Cosmopolitan governance (David Held, 1997) - The Coming Anarchy: Shattering the Dreams of the Post-Cold War (Robert D.Kaplan, 2000) - The Invention of Peace: Reflections on War and the International Order (Michael

    Howard, 2000) - Weapons of Mass Destruction: Freeing the World of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Armas (Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission, 2006) - The Lexus and the Oliver Tree: Understanding Globalization (Thomas L. Friedman, 2000) - Globalization and its Discontents (Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2002) - In Defense of Globalization: The Human Face of a Global World (Jagdish Bhagwati, 2004) - The Rise of Modern China (Immanuel C. Y. Hsü, 1983). Introduction: A Conceptual Framework of Modern China; VII Part: China After Mao: The Search for a New Order - India: A Million Mutinies Now (V. S. Naipaul, 1990). - La Rusia de Putin (Anna Politkovskaya, 2006) - Rusia en la Era de Putin (Carlos Taibo, 2006) - Foreign Affairs: Nov/Dec 2003: China Takes Off / America's Imperial Dilemma Nov/Dec 2005: Iraq & Vietnam - Política Exterior: Julio/Agosto 2006: India / Escenarios Energéticos del Mañana Marzo/Abril 2007: Entre Pakistán y Afganistán / Irán Nuclear

    Course Evaluation:

    20% Tasks and attendance 40% Final exam 30% Projects 10% Subjective evaluation (students are expected to come prepared to class and profesor will value that students are showing a mark of improvement)

    Spanish Grading Scale:

    Matrícula de Honor 10 Sobresaliente 9 – 9,9 Notable 7 – 8,9 Aprobado 5 – 6,9 Suspenso 0 – 4,9 No Asistencia (Student has exceeded the allowed number of unexcused absences)

    Please find as a reference the following grading scale conversion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the student’s home university or institution to determine the final grade equivalencies.

    Matrícula de Honor = A+ Suspenso = F Sobresaliente = A No presentado = Incomplete (attended Notable = B classes but did not take final exam) Aprobado =C No Asistencia = Incomplete (enrolled in the course but did not attend class)

    Appeal grades: The deadline for claiming notes is 30 days from the reception at the university certificate.

    Attendance: class attendance is obligatory, it is checked every class day and it is reflected in the course attendance sheet that is sent to the home University.

    An 85% of attendance is required for the successful completion of the course. Not missing any class will be considered positively.

    If a student exceeds this limit, the grade in the transcript for this subject could appear as “not attended course”.

    Attendance is not only class presence. Professors will encourage active class participation and discussion and will be taken into consideration as part of the course evaluation

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Availability of courses is based on enrollment numbers. All students should seek pre-approval for alternate courses in the event of last minute class cancellations