Social Economy in Latin America

Universidad de Belgrano

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Social Economy in Latin America

  • Host University

    Universidad de Belgrano

  • Location

    Buenos Aires, Argentina

  • Area of Study

    Economics, International Economics, Latin American Studies, Sociology

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    5
  • Overview

    Course Description
    Sustainability is changing the way in how businesses are operated. We live in an
    interconnected world where traditional approaches to business no longer work; so it
    is imperative to change the logic of value creation. The triple bottom line (people,
    planet and profit) are becoming pillars of sustainability and demand that business
    performance be evaluated in the broader context of social benefit. Organizations
    will be successful if they take proactive measures to build social integration. In this
    course we will examine the relationship between the economic system and
    environmental and social policies that add values, such as transparency and mutual
    agreements, on the business, public and social sector in Latin America. Students
    will become familiar with literature about sustainable development and social
    inclusion. By incorporating this knowledge, the course will enhance crossorganizational
    and management practices that support healthier and more
    responsible business. By the end of the semester the student will come up with
    their own projects based on challenging innovation as high-value for companies.

    Course Requirements
    This course requires of a very dynamic student who will benefit from the
    combination of academic and hands on learning. Besides the regular meetings in
    class, the student will have to attend discussion session and lectures, prepare oral
    presentations, analyze case studies and attend three visits outside class time.
    Students will also conduct research on a specific topic, the nature and scope of
    which should be determined in consultation with the professor. By the end of the
    semester, students will present to the class the outcome of this research, and write
    an 8-10-page final paper. The requirements also include four short comprehensive
    quizzes. In addition to this, each student will be expected to make a significant
    contribution to the classroom dialogue. Students need a minimum of 75% of
    attendance to be in good standing for the final exam. Sliding the ID card is the only
    way to track attendance. UB holds to the view that plagiarism constitutes
    intellectual theft and is a serious breach of acceptable conduct. Any student caught
    plagiarizing will immediately be given a “no credit” for all courses taken in the
    semester. There are no make ups for classes falling on public holidays.
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    2
    Grading Policy
    Class participation: 10%
    Assignments (2): 20%
    Individual asignment (10%)
    Supermarket Project (10%)
    Visits (3) 20%
    Midterm presentation: 15%
    Final Exam: 15%
    Final group work: 20%
    For a better understanding of the comparable table for grading: check your
    orientation kit handbook.
    Final group work:
    Students (small groups) will present to the class the “Final work” the outcome of
    their research, and write a 1,500 words final paper.
    Final group presentation format
    Your document must follow this format:
    Times New Roman, size 12 pts, space 1.5 between lines, and margins 3.0 (both left
    and right), approximately 400 words per page. Number the pages and put the
    amount of words in the front page of your paper
    Final paper; 1500 words (+/- 10%, which equals to 6-9 pages)
    Send it to griselda.lassaga@ub.edu.ar (deadline: May 30, 20hs)
    Required Textbooks and Materials
    Griselda Lassaga, ed. Course Reader
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    3
    Academic Calendar
    Week 1: (March 7-9)
    What is business?
    Course introduction. The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard, video and debate.
    What is value for business? What is value for the social sector? What is value for the
    government?
    Group debate about Paris 2015, COP 21: Environment+ businesses + risks+ opportunities.
    Readings:
    Natural Step Canada (2009), Sustainability Primer: “Step by Natural Step. United States
    Edition edited by Natural Step US (2-10).
    Braungart, M.; McDonough, W. and Hoye, S. (2008). Cradle to Cradle (27-44)
    Week 2: (March 14-16)
    What are social enterprises?
    Changing the mindset
    New economies, new paradigm.
    Journal Exercises
    Readings:
    Porter, M. & Kramer, M. (2011);"Creating Shared Value" (4- 17).
    Week 3: (March 21-23)
    How can we change?
    Visit to Telefónica Space
    Developing network business: activities, resources and bonds.
    FPVS Foundation case: material and discussions
    Stakeholders models. NATURA Case Study.
    Readings:
    Natura Harvard Case Study (1-27)
    Wheeler, D.; Colbert, B. and Freeman, E. (2003); "Focusing on Value » (11-13).
    Optional readings:
    Werther, Jr.W. and Chandler, D. (2011); Chapter 5: "The Integration of CSR Into Strategy
    and Culture" (119-143).
    Lassaga, M.G.(2010) Corresponsabilidad; chapter 5:" Lowering Investment risk at the BOP
    using network innovation"(1-22).
    Senge, P. (2010) Chapter 10: "Getting People Engaged" (140-156).
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    4
    Week 4: (March 28-30)
    1st Workshop towards Final Group Paper
    Danon Case Study (A) and (B)
    Readings:
    Danon case study (A) and (B). Harvard Case Study.
    Readings for the workshop
    Honeyman, R. (2014) The B Corp- handbook (151-164).
    Week 5: (April 4-6)
    Circular economy, blue economy.
    Sustainability Portfolio. CSR, new business and new markets
    Visit Telefónica Space
    Assignments (responsibilities per student)
    Optional readings:
    Hart, S.L. (2005); "Capitalism at the Crossroads", The Sustainable Value Portfolio (67-69).
    Week 6: (April 11-xx) Visit to the National Congress
    Bcorporations.
    Patagonia Case Study and Patagonia B .
    Business, environmentally responsible agenda
    Readings:
    Patagonia Harvard Case Study (1-23)
    Patagonia B Harvard Case Study (1-14)
    Week 7: (April 18-20)
    Review for Midterm
    Week 8: (April 25-27)
    Learning by innovation
    Innovation and sustainability
    Readings:
    Nidumolu, R; Prahalad, C.K., and Rangaswami (2009) M.R, Why sustainability is now the
    key driver of innovation (3-10).
    Exercises towards the Supermarket Project (to be presented on week 12)
    Week 9: (May 2-4)
    Recovered factories in Argentina.
    Complementary currency: a new way to manage economies in regional developments
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    5
    Volunteering in Argentina Guest Speaker
    Optional readings:
    Flores, T. (2005) De la culpa a la autogestión. (20-23)
    Sports and art strategies to promote social inclusion in vulnerable sectors of Great Buenos
    Aires.
    Readings
    Brugmann and Prahalad, CK. "Cocreating Business’s. New Social Compact" (2-11).
    Flores, T. (2006) Cuando con otros somos nosotros. Ed. MTD (87-108)
    Week 10. (May 9-11)
    Environmental Practices in Argentina
    Environmental Approach Case Study in Argentina
    Readings
    Dalal- Clayton, B. and Bass, S. (2009) “The challenges of environmental
    mainstreaming"(67-82).
    Week 11 ( May 16-18) Part 4: Social impact in latinamerica
    Learning by mining in Argentina
    Mining industries in Argentina: is it possible to think through the lens of sustainability?
    Reading
    Franks, D. M., Ali, S. H., Kemp, D., Davis, R., Bebbington, A. J. & Scurrah, M. (2014).
    "Conflict translates environmental and social risk into business costs" (1-7)
    Week 12 (May 23-XX)
    Social impact in Latin America
    Emerging markets: inclusive business in Argentina.
    Supermarket exercise in class
    Optional reading:
    Lietaer, B (2005) El Futuro del Dinero (279-299)
    Week 13 (May 30- June 1)
    Poverty and Social Integration
    Poverty sector and emerging markets
    Readings:
    WRI (2008) "Roots of Resilience: Growing the wealth of the poor" (46-68).
    IDB (2015); "A Rising U$ 750 Billion Market". Inter-American Development Bank.
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    6
    Week 14 (June 6-8)
    FINAL EXAM (Tuesday 1st)
    Paper Discussion
    What is the best way to do business?
    1st Round Final presentation.
    Week 15 (June 13-15)
    2nd Round Final presentations.
    Final conclusions
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    7
    Bibliography
    Braungart, M.; McDonough, W. and Hoye, S. (2008). Cradle to Cradle. North Point Press,
    (27-44).
    Brugmann and Prahalad, CK. "Cocreating Business’s. New Social Compact" (2-11).
    Dalal-Clayton, B. and Bass, S. (2009) “The challenges of environmental mainstreaming.
    International Institute for Environmental and Development” (IIED)
    www.environmental–mainstreaming.org (67-82).
    Flores, T. (2005) De la culpa a la autogestión. Peña Lillo, Ediciones Continente (20-23)
    Flores, T. (2006) Cuando con otros somos nosotros; la experiencia asociativa del
    Movimiento de Trabajadores Desocupados. MTD La Matanza Editorial (87-108).
    Franks, D. M., Ali, S. H., Kemp, D., Davis, R., Bebbington, A. J. & Scurrah, M. (2014).
    "Conflict translates environmental and social risk into business costs" Proceedings of
    the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111: 7576-7581
    (1-7).
    Hart, S.L. (2005), Chap 3. " The Sustainable Value Portfolio” Capitalism at the Crossroads.
    Upper Saddle River, NJ: Wharton School Publishing) (67-69).
    Honeyman, R. (2014) The B Corp- handbook. Ed. Berrett-Koehler (151-164).
    Lassaga, M.G. (2016); "Las Nuevas Economías y su impacto en la RSU, Responsabilidad
    Social Universitaria, Caso testigo: Cooperativa La Juanita" en Responsabilidad Social de
    las Universidades; Tomo VI; Ed. Red Latinoamericana de Cooperación Universitaria,
    Buenos Aires.
    Lassaga, M.G. (2010) Corresponsabilidad. Chapter 5: 5 Lowering Investment risk at the
    BOP using network innovation . Buenos Aires: Turmalina (1-22).
    Lietaer, B. (2005), The Future of Money: Creating New Wealth Longseller (279-299).
    Natural Step Canada (2009), Sustainability Primer: “Step by Natural Step. United States
    Edition edited by Natural Step US (2-10).
    Nidumolu, R; Prahalad, C.K., and Rangaswami, M.R, “Why sustainability is now the key
    driver of innovation,” Harvard Business Review, 2009 (3-10).
    Porter, M. & Kramer, M. (2011), "Creating Shared Value". Harvard Business Review
    (4- 17).
    Senge, P. (2010) . Ch.10: "Getting People Engaged" The Necessary Revolution. New York:
    Broadway Books, (140-156).
    Wheeler, D.; Colbert, B. and Freeman, E. (2003); "Focusing on Value: Reconciling Corporate
    Social Responsibility, Sustainability and a Stakeholder Approach, in a Network World.
    Journal of General Management. Vol. 28-No 3 Spring (11-13).
    (PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
    8
    Werther, Jr.W. and Chandler, D. (2011); Ch.5: "The Integration of CSR Into Strategy and
    Culture". Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility, London: Sage Publications (119-
    143).
    World Resources Institute(2008), comp. Roots of Resilience, Growing the Wealth of the
    Poor. www.wri.org (46-68).
    Cases:
    Danon case study (A) and (B). Harvard Case Study. (A: 1-14 y B: 1-2)
    Natura Harvard Case Study (1-27)
    Patagonia Harvard Case Study (1-23)
    Patagonia B Harvard Case Study (1-14)