Microbiology & Immunology

University of Queensland

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Microbiology & Immunology

  • Host University

    University of Queensland

  • Location

    Brisbane, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Human Biology, Microbiology

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    Prerequisite: BIOL1020

    Recommended prerequisite: BIOC2000

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Host University Units

    2
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    6
  • Overview

    Course Description
    This course explores the diversity of microorganisms, their cellular biology, growth & nutrition, metabolism, & basic genetics. The role of microorganism in disease, as well as their ecology & applications in biotechnology is also examined. Students will gain an insight into the immune response to infection by studying the innate, humoral & cellular immune systems & their functions in health & disease. The practical component of the course will include laboratory experiments to demonstrate principles learned in the lectures, where students will gain practical skills in safely handling microbial cultures for isolation & identification. The course provides the fundamental knowledge & skills needed to proceed further in microbiology, but also for all courses or disciplines involving molecular biology & biotechnology.
     
     
    Course Introduction
    Microorganisms encompass the greatest evolutionary and metabolic diversity of all living organisms on the planet. Microbiology is the study of these microorganisms which individually cannot be seen without the aid of a microscope. They include the prokaryotic cellular organisms such as the archaea and bacteria, eukaryotic organisms such as yeasts and filamentous fungi, and the non-cellular viruses. Microbes were the first forms of biological life to evolve over 3.5 billion years ago and continue to shape and sustain the environment. Some microorganisms are serious pathogens of humans, animals, or plants, but others have beneficial biotechnological applications in industry, agriculture, and waste water treatment. In this introductory course you will explore the diversity of microorganisms, their cellular biology, growth and nutrition, metabolism, and basic genetics. You will learn of the role of microorganism in disease, as well as their ecology and applications in biotechnology. You will also gain an insight into the immune response to infection by studying the innate, humoral and cellular immune systems and their functions in health and disease. You will undertake laboratory experiments to demonstrate principles learned in the lectures, and gain practical skills to aseptically handle cultures safely for isolation and identification. This course provides the fundamental knowledge and skills needed to proceed further in microbiology, but also for all courses or disciplines involving molecular biology and biotechnology.
     
     
    Learning Objectives
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
    • Identify fundamental concepts in microbiology that are required for further studies in microbiology, molecular biology, and biotechnology
    • Explain the structure and function of the components of a variety of microbial cells
    • Categorize prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viral microorganisms based on their growth, nutrition, metabolism, and physiological diversity
    • Apply the principles of molecular phylogeny to explain the diversity and evolutionary relationships of microorganisms (archaea, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, algae, and viruses) across a variety of ecosystems).
    • Identify microorganisms that are important in health and disease in mammals through their transmission cycles, modes of replication, and mechanisms of pathogenesis
    • Differentiate between the different aspects of the immune system (innate, humoral, cellular) and explain how each component would respond in both healthy and diseased states
    • Proficiently utilise technical laboratory skills to study bacteria, viruses, and the immune response while maintaining high safety standards
    • Clearly communicate experimental results through the accurate recording and evaluation of laboratory observations
     
    Class Contact
    3 Lecture hours, 3 Practical or Laboratory hours

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Some courses may require additional fees.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.