Crime Analysis and Investigation

Griffith University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Crime Analysis and Investigation

  • Host University

    Griffith University

  • Location

    Gold Coast, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Criminal Justice

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3 - 4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4 - 6
  • Overview

    Course Description
    This course/unit is capable of standing as an independent unit of study but ideally follows 2002CCJ/CCJ22 Introduction to Policing. On completion, students will be conversant with the dominant theories explaining the relationship between crime and place, understand the main types of logical reasoning and be able to apply a systematic framework for analysis to crime problems. The second half of the course deals with specific topics, such as victim-, place-, offender-oriented analyses and how these inform tactical decisions and intervention work. While conceptual in parts, the objective of the course is pragmatic. Students do not need high level mathematical ability to do well in this course, only systematic and clear thinking.
    Course Introduction
    This course is capable of standing as an independent unit of study but ideally follows 2002CCJ Introduction to Policing. On completion, students will be conversant with the dominant theories explaining the relationship between crime and place, understand the main types of logical reasoning and be able to apply a systematic framework for analysis to crime problems.
    Course Aims
    This course has three components. The first part deals with understanding crime, including the major theories as well as briefly dealing with common cognitive errors associated with diagnosing problems. The second part deals with how to analyse crimes and focus on victim-, offender- and place-oriented analyses. The final component of the course outlines how to prevent crime. While conceptual in parts, the objective of the course is pragmatic and to equip students with transferable skills. Students do not need a high level mathematical ability to do well on this course, only systematic and clear thinking.
    Learning Outcomes
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:
    1 recall in depth concepts relating to theories of crime, crime analysis, hypothesis generation and testing, situational crime prevention and their inter-connections
    2 critique a crime prevention initiative drawing on crime theories and models of crime analysis;
    3 examine crime patterns and choose appropriate action for crime prevention in an hypothetical crime data set;

    Assessment Task

    Weighting/Marked out of

    Assignment - Written Assignment
    Assignment 1: Critique of Analysis

    30%/30

    Assignment - Written Assignment
    Assignment 2: Analysis Exercise

    40%/40

    Exam - selected response
    Final/End Study Period Exam

    30%/30

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.