Foundations of Western Culture

Griffith University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Foundations of Western Culture

  • Host University

    Griffith University

  • Location

    Gold Coast, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Classics, History

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Lower

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3 - 4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4 - 6
  • Overview

    Course Description
    1705LHS will introduce you to major ideas, cultures, people and innovations in the emergence of western culture, from ancient civilisations to the twentieth century. As we engage broadly with the ancient classical civilisations of Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome, the transformations of Medieval and Renaissance Europe, the Enlightenment and its aftermath, you will also explore and critique the values and beliefs we associate with the idea of the west today including Citizenship, Humanism, Equality, Democracy. As we explore these epochs we will also examine the idea of change itself as a shaping force in contemporary culture. Incompatible: 1705ART Foundations of Western Culture.

    Course Introduction
    Foundations of Western Culture aims to enrich your understanding of human culture and society, how to think about and respond to key questions and issues associated with traditional 'western' values, and how to engage in contemporary challenges such as civic responsibility, ethics and technology.

    Starting with Ancient Mesopotamia, each week we will offer you a different theme or topic, in roughly chronological order, grouped into three course sections: 'The Ancient World'; 'The Medieval & Renaissance Worls'; and 'From Enlightenment to Modernity'. You are encouraged to look beyond what is known as ‘the West’ and explore how the values, attitudes and beliefs conveyed through this cultural heritage continue to shape the contemporary world.

    The course offers a sound basis for those who are interested in advanced studies in writing, journalism, history, literature, languages, fine art, philosophy, politics and/or sociology. You are encouraged to become critically informed and to develop a broad range of abilities in research, writing, intellectual synthesis, oral communication, analytical thinking and problem-solving which are highly applicable to future study and employment.

    Above all the course helps develop the skills to ask questions, extend knowledge and deepen understanding of significant ideas, events and cultural forms that shape how we think and live now.

    Course Aims

    This course enriches your understanding of human culture and society, how to think about and respond to key questions and issues associated with traditional 'western' values, and how to engage in contemporary challenges of civic responsibility.

    We explore the origins and development of Western culture, society and politics, from ancient civilisations through the rise of Western Europe to the present. Students are encouraged to reflect on the impacts beyond what is known as ‘the West’ and to explore how the values, attitudes and beliefs expressed within this cultural heritage continue to shape the contemporary world.

    Foundations of Western Culture offers a sound basis for those who are interested in advanced studies in history, literature, fine art, philosophy, politics and/or sociology. Students are given the opportunity to develop a broad range of abilities in communication and analysis which are highly applicable to other study and professional employment.

    Above all the course helps develop the skills to ask questions, extend knowledge and deepen understanding of significant ideas, events and cultural forms that shape how we think and live now.

    Learning Outcomes
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:

    1. Discuss key features of significant phases in the development of Western culture;
    2. Critically interrogate the values and ideas of European cultural history in terms of its influence on present day culture, place and society;
    3. Apply principles and practices of research to develop and communicate your ideas, citing and referencing from scholarly interpretation and evidence.
    4. Engage in productive dialogue with others about the contemporary relevance and application of issues, knowledge and value formation.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.