Physics of Solids and Nanoscale Structures

Griffith University

Course Description

  • Course Name

    Physics of Solids and Nanoscale Structures

  • Host University

    Griffith University

  • Location

    Gold Coast, Australia

  • Area of Study

    Physics

  • Language Level

    Taught In English

  • Prerequisites

    Assumed Background:
    Some content form the following courses may be used:

    2304NSC Statistical and Solid State Physics

    2303NSC Classical and quantum Physics II

    2203NSC Mathematics 2A

    2301NSC Electromagnetism and Optics

  • Course Level Recommendations

    Upper

    ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators.We advice each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regrading course levels.

    Hours & Credits

  • Credit Points

    10
  • Recommended U.S. Semester Credits
    3 - 4
  • Recommended U.S. Quarter Units
    4 - 6
  • Overview

    Course Description:
    This course covers in detail the physics and mathematics of periodic solids and some nanostructures: electron Bloch waves; bands; effective mass; holes; metals, insulators, semiconductors; scattering; transport; introductory superconductivity; introductory surface/interface physics; phonons; phonon specific heat; anharmonic properties of solids; point defects ; diffusion; dislocations and the strength of crystals; magnetic solids; magnetic, electronic and vibrational properties of some nanostructures.

    Course Introduction
    The course extends the development of the theory of solids introduced in the second-year Solid State Physics module. It enables the student to understand in some detail what happens inside solids - for example how electrons move following quantum mechanics, how a crystal lattice vibrates, and how all this relates to the observed properties of matter (Materials Science).

    Band theory is formally introduced and related to materials properties such as electrical resistance. The properties of phonons are explored, emphasising the consequences of anharmonic interatomic potentials. The effects of defects in real crystals on materials properties are introduced. Some magnetic properties of condensed matter (paramgnetism, ferromagnetism and superparamagnetism in particular) are introduced.

    Course Aims
    This course aims to provide a detailed understanding of the way that electrons move in solids. It also aims to introduce the vibrational, magnetic and thermal properties of solids, both ideal and with defects. This understanding, coming from quantum and classical mechanics, is the physical basis behind modern electronics, magnetics and much of materials science. This is useful knowledge for a physics graduate and for anyone working at the physical end of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It aims also to interest electronic engineering students as an elective.

    Learning Outcomes
    After successfully completing this course you should be able to:

    1  Students should understand in detail the physics and mathematics of periodic solids and some nanostructures, including the following : quantum mechanical theory of electronic Bloch waves; bands; effective mass; holes; metals, insulators, semiconductors; scattering; transport; introductory superconductivity; introductory surface/interface physics; magnetism, phonons; phonon specific .heat; anharmonic properties of solids; point defects in monatomic ionic solids; diffusion; dislocations and the strength of crystals; magnetic solids; magnetic, electronic and vibrational properties of some nanostructures. Students will appreciate how basic physical principles and formalisms permit the properties of these particular systems to be related to a deeper understanding of the unity of natural phenomena.

Course Disclaimer

Courses and course hours of instruction are subject to change.

Eligibility for courses may be subject to a placement exam and/or pre-requisites.

Credits earned vary according to the policies of the students' home institutions. According to ISA policy and possible visa requirements, students must maintain full-time enrollment status, as determined by their home institutions, for the duration of the program.