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Latin American Studies - Universidad de Belgrano (UB) - Fall 2 2017
Social Economy in Latin America

Course Code: PALAS 330
Language of Instruction: English
Course taken with: International Students
Universidad de Belgrano (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Area of Study
Latin American Studies in English (PALAS)
Hours & Credits

54

Contact Hours

3

Recommended U.S. Semester Credits

5

Recommended U.S. Quarter Units

Course Level Recommendations:

Recommendation: Upper Division


ISA offers course level recommendations in an effort to facilitate the determination of course levels by credential evaluators. We advise each institution to have their own credentials evaluator make the final decision regarding course levels.
Prerequisites and Language Level

Language Level: Taught In English

Overview

Course Description:
Argentina?s economy is best understood within the context of Latin American economic history. This course includes topics such as the Argentine economy before and after 1930; economic growth and structure; external terms of exchange between agricultural exports and imported industrial goods; foreign currency shortages; structural changes and the process of industrialization; import substitution; relative prices; capital formation; and economic cycles. Inflation, devaluations, recessions and stabilization programs, and hyperinflation will also be discussed. Finally, the course will consider Argentina?s Convertibility Law - a currency board implemented throughout the 1990s ? and more recent trends in inflation, economic growth and unemployment.
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(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY

MA. Griselda Lassaga
Program in Argentine and Latin American Studies
Universidad de Belgrano

Instruction in English

Course Description
Environmentally, technologically, economically and culturally, we live in an
interconnected world where traditional approaches to business no longer
work. Environmental problems and social issues are becoming increasingly
important. Notions of sustainable development and fair trade are forcing companies
to radically rethink their business strategies. New structures and beliefs and a
redistribution of existing resources are required to build sustainable businesses.
Here, the work of C.K. Prahalad and Stuart Hart has been ground-breaking: added
values, such as transparency and mutual agreements, are just part of a new vision
of business (PFA).

Course Requirements

This course requires of a very dynamic student who will benefit from the
combination of academic and practical learning. Besides the regular meetings in
class, the student will have to attend discussion session and lectures, prepare oral
presentations, and analyze case studies. She/He will also conduct research on a
specific topic, the nature and scope of which should be determined in consultation
with the professor. By the end of the semester, students will present to the class
the outcome of this research, and write an 8-10-page final paper. The requirements
also include four short comprehensive quizzes. In addition to this, each student will
be expected to make a significant contribution to the classroom dialogue. Students
need a minimum of 75% of attendance to be in good standing for the final exam.
Sliding the ID card is the only way to track record of attendance. UB holds to the
view that plagiarism constitutes intellectual theft and is a serious breach of
acceptable conduct. Any student caught plagiarizing will immediately be given a ?no
credit? for all courses taken in the semester. There is no make ups for classes falling
on public holidays.

Grading Policy

Class participation: 20%
Oral Presentations: 15%
Quizzes (4): 25 %
Group Presentation: 20%
Final Exam: 20%

For a better understanding of the comparable table for grading: check your
orientation kit handbook.

Required Textbooks and Materials

Griselda Lassaga, ed. Course Reader.

Academic Calendar

Week 1
Day1.1 (July 27)
Course introduction
Economic context: national and regional. Impact on business. Immigration and
regional development. Public and Private Sector.
Day1.1 (July 29)
Cultural Context. Argentinian regions and impact on business.
Readings: www.econlink.com.ar Social Economy.pdf
PRAHALAD, C.K.; Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, Eradicating Poverty through
Profits. Wharton School Publishing. 2006
Week 2
Day 2.1 (August 3)
Millenium Goals and the Global Compact. Skills and systemic thinking.
Recommended reading: TBA
Day 2.2 (August 5)
Enterprises and Global Compact in Argentina. Cases.
Exercises
Readings: YUNUS, Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the
Future of Capitalism
Week 3
Day 3.1 (August 10)
Sustainability Portfolio. CSR, Inclusive Business and new Markets
Readings: HART, S.L. Capitalism at the Crossroads (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Wharton
School Publishing). 2005
(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
3
Day 2.1 (August 12)
BoP Protocol 2008, Toward next generation BoP Strategies. Cases
Readings: SIMANIS and HART. The Base of the Pyramid Protocol Second Version
Cornell´s Business School, 2008
Week 4
Day 4.1 (August 17)
Complementary currency: a new way to manage economies in regional
developments
Readings: The Future of Money: Creating New Wealth Longseller, 2005
Day 4.2 (August 19)
Students will be assigned their case write ups for presentations and final paper.
Team work.
Review of Week 1
Week 5
Day 5.1 (August 24)
Best strategies to do business in Latin America. Bankers and the New Economy.
Readings: How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New
Ideas, Updated Edition
Day 5.2 (August 26)
Garantizar for small and medium business. Commercial company of private
character, conformed as special type of legal entity legislated in the Laws 24.467
and 25.300, also called Laws Pymes.
Guests manager of Garantizar.
Week 6
Day 6.1 (August 31)
Local development and fair trade. Challengues for inclusive Business. Agrobusiness
Readings: LONDON, T., and RONDINELLI D.; ?Partnership for Learning. Managing
Tensions in Non Profit Organisations: Alliances with Corporations?, Stanford Social
Innovation Review 1.3: 28-35. 2003
Day 6.2 (September 2)
The next 4 billion. Market size and business strategy at the base of the pyramid
Readings: The next 4 billion. Market size and business strategy at the base of the
pyramid. World Resources Institute, 2007
Week 7
Day 7.1 (September 7)
The New Deal: ECOTURISM FARM
(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
4
Thinking within the sustainability frame, this choice includes business, tourism,
ecological perspective and sustainable values.
- Farm Model Ñandú only in Argentina, led by its owner.
Interaction with Animals.
- Organic vegetable production under forced.
Readings: LONDON, T., and RONDINELLI D.; ?Partnership for Learning. Managing
Tensions in Non Profit Organisations: Alliances with Corporations?, Stanford Social
Innovation Review 1.3: 28-35. 2003
Day 7.2 (September 9)
Corporations borned in Argentina. Arcor Group?s case study.
Review of Week 3
Week 8
Day 8.1 (September 14)
Wine and Tourism. Wine and wine business.
Reading:
MILSTEIN, M., HART, S. and LONDON, T.; ?Revolutionary Routines?, in Handbook of
Transformative Cooperation ? New Designs and Dynamics, Piderit, S. K., R. E. Fry
and D. L. Cooperrider (Editors) (Stanford-CA: Stanford University Press); 2007
Day 8.2 (September 16)
Logistic company. Andreani, case study.
Week 9
Day 9.1 (September 23)
Grassroots. Local cultures and lifestyles. Design for Sustainability.
Review for Week 4
Guest speakers: NGO (to be confirmed)
Readings: WRI- World Resources Institute. Roots of Resilience, Growing the Wealth
of the Poor. www.wri.org 2008
Water challenges. Case study.
Readings: DELF UNIVERSITY. The First Learning Experience of Designing for the
BoP. 2010
Week 10
Day 10.1 (September 28)
The SFrontier Beyond CSR. Social capital a new way to do business and make a
difference.
(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
5
Readings:
RAINEY, D.; Sustainable Development and Enterprise Management: Creating Value
through Business Integration, Innovation and Leadership. Oxford University at its
colloquium on ?Regulating Sustainable Development: Adapting to Globalization in the
21st Century?-August 8 through 13, 2004
Day 10.2 (September 30)
Business Socially Responsible. Social and Economy Inclusion.
Best practices. Value chain, networking
Readings:
Inclusive Business. IARSE ? Avina Fundation 1st edition. 2009
Week 11
Day 11.1 (October 5)
Creating change within the culture. Leadership, corporate voluntaree.
Tom´s of Maine case.
Day 11.1 (October 7)
Guest speakers: World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD).
Corporate social responsibility and poverty issues.
Week 12
Day 12.1 (October 12)
Developing network business: activities, resources and bonds.
FPVS Foundation case: material and discussions
Readings:
HAKANSSON, H and SNEHOTA, I. Developing Relationships in Business Networks.
Routledge Publications, London. 1995
Day 12.2 (October 14)
Best Practices. Base on models, students will be assigned their case write ups for
presentations and final paper.
Team work in class.
Week 13
Day 13.1 (October 19)
New Social Compact. Innovative local businesses such as self-help savings and loan
groups and construction enterprises.
Readings: BRUGMANN AND C.K. PRAHALAD. Concreating Business?s. New Social
Compact, 2007
Day 13.2 (October 21)
Financing sustainable. Trust fund and microfinance.
Investor challenges. Fundraising and coordination of capital
(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
6
Readings: NEW VENTURES- WRI On the frontiers of finance. Scaling up investment
in Sustainable Small and Medium Enterprises in Developing Countries, 2009
Week 14
Day 14.1 (October 26)
New Approaches to Low Income Marktes
Emerging markets and emerging models. Business models that works.
Day 14.2 (October 28)
Technics: pay per use, solutions to the challenges of global poverty.
Readings: KUBZANSKY and others. Emerging Marktes, Emergign Models,
www.monitor.com , 2009
Week 15
Day 15.1 (November 2)
Final Papers: Discussion groups What is the best way to do business?
1st Round Final presentation Final conclusions
Day 15.2 (November 4)
2nd Round Final presentation
Final conclusions

Bibliography

GROWING INCLUSIVE BUSINESS "Creating Value for All: Strategies for Doing
Business with the Poor"- www.growinginclusivemarkets.org .Global report
2008 ISBN 978-92-1-126224-7
HART, S.L. Capitalism at the Crossroads (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Wharton School
Publishing). 2005 Book ISBN 10: 0-13-613439-4 ISBN-13: 978-0-13-613439-
8
KANDACHAR, P; Sustainability Challenges at the Base of the Pyramid. Greenleaf
Publishing, Sheffield. 2008 ISBN 978-1-906093-11-2
HAKANSSON, H and SNEHOTA, I. Developing Relationships in Business Networks.
Routledge Publications, London. 1995 ISBN-10: 1861522355 ISBN-13: 978-
1861522351
PRAHALAD, C.K.; Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, Eradicating Poverty through
Profits. Wharton School Publishing. 2006 ISBN-10: 0131467506; ISBN-13:
978-0131467507
SENGE, P; SCHARMER, O; JAWORSKI, J and FLOWERS, B. S.; Presence: Exploring
(PALAS 330) SOCIAL ECONOMY
7
Profound Change in People, Organizations and Society. Doubleday, Random
House, New York. 2004 ISBN: 0-385-51624
SIMANIS, E. and HART S.; The Base of the Pyramid Protocol BOP Strategy, 2nd ed.
Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise, Johnson School of Management.
Cornell. 2008 ISBN 978-1-906093-11-2
WRI- World Resources Institute. Roots of Resilience, Growing the Wealth of the Poor.
www.wri.org 2008 ISBN 978-1-56973-729-3

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